T imes are definitely changing and the truck scene is no different. Back in the day, lifting a truck took more work than it usually does today. Going to extreme heights was not an easy task and required expert fabrication. In the last decade, we have witnessed an increase in offerings from many suspension companies that remove any complications to creating a big truck. Though these kits help many people achieve their goals, they aren’t the best solution, as both form and capabilities can be compromised as a result.

Taking things back to the roots of four wheelin’ is Denver Carter’s ’19 Chevy Silverado High Country. Chevrolet claims that this is their most advanced truck to date, but Denver thought there was room for improvement. Tearing into a new truck is not something to take lightly, and Denver had confidence in his shop’s team at Truks N’ Stuff of LaGrange, GA. When approached by Hammerhead Armor about building a ’19 Silverado for the upcoming SEMA Show, Denver decided that this was an opportunity to not pass up and purchased the 4×4 to make it all happen.

It may be a cliché, but creating this truck before the ’18 SEMA Show was a large undertaking. Building a beast from the latest model meant that there were many unknowns that needed to be handled in a short amount of time despite the desire to have a completed ’19 Chevy unlike any other – but it was worth it in the end. Denver got the truck a mere 40 days before the show and made a few calls to all the big name suspension companies and quickly found that there were no parts available yet, as they were all in development stages on them.

Since Denver’s team consists of true enthusiasts that are experienced in fabricating off-road suspension, he decided to take the plunge by creating a fully custom system for this truck. Getting the jump on the build, Denver picked up a set of 1-ton axles from a 2006 Ford Super Duty to improve the truck’s functions. From there, the team used DOM tubing and joints from RuffStuff Specialties to create the front and rear four-link systems that utilize a set of F-O-A coil-over shocks. To make the front straight axle swap work, a hydraulic power steering pump and gear box from a ’08 Chevy HD were retrofitted. Converting the steering system threw off the factory ECU, which had to be reconfigured in order to get the truck out of its safety mode.

With the truck up and functioning again, it was now time to improve on the styling. The first thing on the list were the 26×16 TIS Forged 544 BM wheels that are wrapped in 42” Fury Offroad M/T tires. The Silverado was then beefed up with a set of bumpers from Hammerhead Armor and a grille from Boost-Bars. The finishing touch was the t flat gray vinyl by S4L Wraps. Though it was a struggle to make this truck happen, it made it to the show and in grand fashion. Denver and his team not only completed a build with Chevy’s latest pickup, they created a unique ride that will be remembered for its originality and stance that pays homage to traditional off-road trucks.